Honesty is the best policy.

14 Sep

[NOTE: In my blog post today, I write about losing weight and exercising. I do realize that my personal experience cannot be universally applied to everyone else’s medical situation and physical condition and abilities. I am not being judgmental towards other people who are overweight or can’t exercise due to physical disability. Really, this blog post is all about me–and now that I’ve written and published it, I guess I will have to hold myself accountable to the promise I’ve made myself to lose a few pounds by being more active, as I am able, and eating less. I’m letting you “in” on this pledge I’ve made to myself, hoping that someone “out there” might also be inspired to make a commitment to get healthier, as they are able.]

Today, I am stuck at home. Why? Because I am doing a 24-hour urine collection for my doctor and I don’t want to go anywhere today and take my “hat” and urine collection jug with me in case I need to pee. I know, this is probably too much information for some of my readers. I’ve just recently started on the “standard” treatment for adults with XLH—Calcitriol and Phospha 250 Neutral—and I guess part of that standard course of treatment is doing a 24-hour urine collection to see how my kidneys are affected. We do have a phosphorous wasting disorder, and the kidneys are a big part of making sure most our phosphorous gets wasted as per the instructions on the PHEX gene of the faulty X chromosome. As I have mentioned in a previous post, my body is following those genetic instructions very well; it’s just too bad the instructions are wrong.

So, I’m at home, knitting a baby hat for someone I know who’s going to have a baby in a few weeks, listening to the gentle snores of the dogs and pondering the big things in life like, is it time for lunch yet?

What has led to the pondering of lunch is, ironically, that I started on a diet last week, with the help and wise advice of Professorgrrl, who has a calorie-counting app on her smartphone. (Note to self: ask her how many calories are burned when one blogs?)

Professorgrrl and I had an interesting discussion while on a walk this morning. We were discussing an elderly woman that we know who, though she’s had more than one MRI on her back PLUS back surgery, is determined that her doctor needs to order another MRI for her back, “to see what’s going on.” The woman is 80 years old, doesn’t exercise, sits in her recliner all day and watches TV, but does get up to walk down to the elevator to go to the dining room (she lives in an independent living facility) three times a day to eat. For this woman, there seems to be, in her mind anyway, some therapeutic value to getting an MRI. I don’t dispute that sometimes knowing exactly what your problem is does help you to deal with it better. I asked Professorgrrl if she thought that the doctor would just order the test OR would she say, “Your problem is that you sit in your recliner all day and do nothing but think about yourself. You need to get off your butt and walk around several times a day; you need to socialize with other people; you need to get involved in some activities around there and stop thinking about yourself so much and get a little bit of exercise while you’re at it.” We concluded that there aren’t many doctors who are that brutally honest. Why did we conclude this?

Well, I have the same family doctor as this elderly woman. I just had my yearly physical a couple weeks ago, and my doctor said nothing about my weight gain. In fact, I have seen three different doctors in the last year, plus their nurses, and not one single medical person has said to me, “Banjogrrl, I have noticed that your weight seems to be trending upwards. If you keep gaining, by the time you’re 65, you will be in sorry shape. Have you changed your eating habits? Have you stopped walking every day? Why are you slowly gaining weight? Do you know what this will eventually do to your already arthritic knees and hips? Not to mention your back pain, too?” Nope, not one single comment from a medical professional. In fact, my family doctor looked at my lab work results and said that my cholesterol looked really good and I seemed to be fine, see ya next year.

Now, if you were to look at me, you wouldn’t notice that I’ve gained weight steadily over the years. I have never had a shapely shape that could be lost with weight gain. I’m pretty much shaped like a tree stump—short with no hips, or anything to suggest an “hourglass” shape that American women strive for. I know some of you who know me personally will probably read this and scold me for saying I’m shaped like a tree stump. A stump is NOT a bad thing. Read the children’s book, “The Giving Tree.”

However, the doctors and nurses all have those numbers in front of them and could easily look at the amount I weigh now and say, “You’re gaining weight. Why?”

I am not saying that the responsibility of losing weight is on them, either. I know it’s all my responsibility. I am a bit surprised that the insurance company hasn’t stepped in and said to their customers, “We’re sorry. Because you are over your ideal weight, we are not going to allow you to have knee replacement surgery, blood pressure medication, cholesterol medication, etc. You need to get your act together first, then we’ll review your case.” I hope that day doesn’t come, since the insurance companies control the world enough already.

I do think, though, that some strong encouragement from a medical professional might go a long way. My doctor could have said, “Banjogrrl, have you considered the possible problems in your future if you allow your weight to continue to trend upwards? Can you make a plan to stop that increase?” Maybe she’s being overly compassionate, because she realizes I have the mobility and pain issues that come with XLH. Perhaps she can’t bring herself to use “tough love” on her patients. Maybe she won’t be able to bring herself to say to my elderly friend, “Have you considered the consequences of sitting on your butt all day in your room and doing nothing but watch TV? Change your sedentary, hermit-like lifestyle and after a year of implementing that change, talk to me.”

She probably won’t say something like what my dad’s doctor said to him once, regarding his diabetes. “If you don’t lose weight and change your eating habits, you’re going to die. Are you ready for that?” My dad wasn’t ready, thank goodness. His doctor wasn’t politically correct in his approach, either. But sometimes, do we need a kick in the pants? I think I need one regularly, and if you have XLH, then you know how hard it is to literally or figuratively kick your own self in the pants.

So, I’ve decided to give myself some “tough love” and I plan to try to lose 11.5% of what I weighed last week before I started this adventure. Right now I am being encouraged by Professorgrrl. Oh, and her phone app, too. Here’s a list of fun calorie burning activities, which is important to know, because you can eat those calories in snacks or dessert later:

30 minutes of playing Croquet burns 81 calories.

30 minutes of gardening burns 105 calories.

30 minutes of fishing burns 88 calories. I need to renew my state fishing license.

15 minutes of juggling burns 53 calories. I know how to juggle, but 15 minutes at a time is plenty for me.

30 minutes of Wii bowling burns 60 calories and 30 minutes of REAL bowling burns 70 calories. This, in my opinion, makes the case for staying at home to bowl, because you don’t have to rent smelly ill-fitting shoes and eat high-calorie, over-priced snacks. You should invite someone over, though, because socializing is part of the fun of bowling.

30 minutes of walking with a dog burns 70 calories. I think that 30 minutes of walking a maniacal Jack Russell Terrier burns 100 calories.

30 minutes of playing the guitar while sitting down burns 35 calories.

30 minutes of playing the piano burns 46 calories.

30 minutes of playing a woodwind instrument burns 28 calories. Another good reason to take up the guitar or piano.

Yesterday, I played my hammered dulcimer at a wedding for approximately 1.5 hours. Playing the hammered dulcimer isn’t on the list of instruments in the calorie counting app; however, since it is a percussion instrument, I looked for the amount of calories burned while playing the drums. Thirty minutes of playing the drums burns 98 calories! I practiced many hours this week in preparation for the wedding so I’m pretty sure that earned me some chocolate.

Dulcimer set up for wedding

A pretty location for a wedding and a hammered dulcimer.

Overlooking dulcimer at wedding

We made it through the bride’s processional music, Pachelbel’s Canon in D. At this point in the service, we’re waiting to play the recessional music, “Haste to the Wedding.” The recessional music burns more calories than the processional music, since it’s much faster and in 6/8 time, which is considered “jig” time. Dancing a jig burns many more calories than playing a jig, but hey, you do what you can do.

Copyright 2014, S.G. Hunter and Banjogrrldiaries. All rights reserved.

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4 Responses to “Honesty is the best policy.”

  1. Alise from Auckland September 15, 2014 at 5:01 am #

    o no. some reprieve from the constant bombardment of weight loss messages and diet discussion would be good. Seems the only place I get a reprieve is my deams…literally.

    • banjogrrldiaries September 15, 2014 at 10:06 am #

      Thank you for reading and thank you for your comment. You bring up an excellent point, and it makes me ponder my reasons even more for writing about something that is, as I mentioned in my note, “all about me.” I appreciate your honesty!

  2. Kimberly September 2, 2015 at 2:45 pm #

    Thank you for your excellent blog. You won me over with this post (new reader, so just skimming a few entries, but I know well the “pain” of a 24 hour urine collection to check the levels. My endocrinologist orders them every year & while I dread them, this year’s lab work saved my kidneys.
    Anyhow, thanks for your honest, encouraging writing. I look forward to reading all of the entries as I convalesce from surgery next week. Keep up the wonderful work & best wishes for good health and happiness.

    • banjogrrldiaries September 2, 2015 at 4:28 pm #

      Thank you for your comment. I read back over my post after I received your comment and it was the kick in the pants I needed to keep trying to keep the weight under control.
      I wish you well during you surgery and hope the recovery time goes quickly! Thanks for reading!

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